Consequences of teen dating violence

It was designed to move the discussion from the question of why young women do not report harassment and abuse to the topic of how violence is produced, maintained and normalized among youths.Hlavka says she felt that the results of the study, which will be published in the June issue of , were disturbing yet also not altogether surprising.Long-term health effects for those in violent relationships include substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and further domestic violence. Hlavka, assistant professor of criminology and law studies at Marquette University, led the study that included Patricia’s experience.Normalizing Sexual Violence: Young Women Account for Harassment and Abuseanalyzed 100 forensic interviews conducted by a Midwest children’s advocacy center of youths between the ages of 3 and 17 who may have been sexually assaulted.

In young adulthood, females who had experienced teen dating violence reported increased depression symptoms and were 1.5 times more likely to binge drink or smoke and twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts.Males who had experienced teen dating violence reported more anti-social behaviors, were 1.3 times more likely to use marijuana and twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts.The study controlled for pubertal development, child maltreatment history and a range of socio-demographic factors."In this regard, we found evidence that teen relationships can matter a great deal over the long run." Exner-Cortens and her co-authors analyzed a sample of 5,681 American heterosexual youths ages 12-18 from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health who were interviewed as teens and approximately five years later as young adults about their dating experiences and mental and behavioral health.Participants were asked if a partner had ever used insults, name-calling or disrespect in front of others; had sworn at them; threatened violence; pushed or shoved them; or thrown objects that could hurt them.